21yr old lookin to kill time so no real focus to my Tumblr. Reblog stuff I find insightful, interesting, funny, and/or beautiful.

Don’t fool yourself. English isn’t inherently superior, or easier to learn, or more sonically pleasing. Its international usage comes from forceful assimilation and legacy of colonialistic injection. It isn’t a deed that one should take pride in. By my uncle left this comment on his friend’s Facebook status, a white British man who was bragging about how easy it is to be a native English speaker when trekking to different nations. (via commanderspock)

The depth of isolation in the ghetto is also evident in black speech patterns, which have evolved steadily away from Standard American English. Because of their intense social isolation, many ghetto residents have come to speak a language that is increasingly remote from that spoken by American whites. Black street speech, or more formally, Black English Vernacular, has its roots in the West Indian creole and Scots-Irish dialects of the eighteenth century. As linguists have shown, it is by no means a “degenerate,” or “illogical” version of Standard American English; rather, it constitutes a complex, rich, and expressive language in its own right, with a consistent grammar, pronunciation, and lexicon all its own. By

Douglas Massey and Nancy A. Denton, Chapter 6: “The Perpetuation of the Underclass,” p. 162 (American apartheid: segregation and the making of the underclass)

As linguists have shown, it is by no means a “degenerate,” or “illogical” version of Standard American English; rather, it constitutes a complex, rich, and expressive language in its own right, with a consistent grammar, pronunciation, and lexicon all its own.

(via deux-zero-deux)

Reblogged from halftheskymovement  60 notes
halftheskymovement:

Carol Costelleo CNN anchor decided to speak out about the recent NFL controversy involving player Ray Rice (who knocked his wife unconscious), his coach John Harbaugh (who thinks “it’s not a big deal”), the NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell (who believes “justice” has been served by a two-game suspension), the Baltimore Ravens’ Twitter page (who claims that Janay Rice herself “deeply regrets the role she played the night of the incident”), and ESPN’s Stephen A. Smith (who chose to focus on the “elements of provocation”).Costello admitted to have been a victim of domestic violence herself, and found the need to address how the male-dominated sports world is downplaying the importance of Rice’s acts with not only a soft punishment, but also placing the blame on the domestic violence survivor.She leaves us with the reminder that “one in four women will experience domestic violence during her lifetime,” and that “one-third of female homicide victims are killed by their current or former partner.”
Read more via CNN.

halftheskymovement:

Carol Costelleo CNN anchor decided to speak out about the recent NFL controversy involving player Ray Rice (who knocked his wife unconscious), his coach John Harbaugh (who thinks “it’s not a big deal”), the NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell (who believes “justice” has been served by a two-game suspension), the Baltimore Ravens’ Twitter page (who claims that Janay Rice herself “deeply regrets the role she played the night of the incident”), and ESPN’s Stephen A. Smith (who chose to focus on the “elements of provocation”).

Costello admitted to have been a victim of domestic violence herself, and found the need to address how the male-dominated sports world is downplaying the importance of Rice’s acts with not only a soft punishment, but also placing the blame on the domestic violence survivor.

She leaves us with the reminder that “one in four women will experience domestic violence during her lifetime,” and that “one-third of female homicide victims are killed by their current or former partner.”

Read more via CNN.

Reblogged from humansofnewyork  9,271 notes
humansofnewyork:

“We fled to the Philippines, which was under American occupation at the time. But it wasn’t long before the Japanese took over the islands. We were living in Manila, and when the Japanese occupied the city, they began to teach us to read and write Japanese. When the Americans came to retake the city, they invaded from the north, and the Japanese blew up the bridges and barricaded themselves in the southern part of the city where we lived. Shells were falling all around us, because the Japanese had stationed a gun encampment across from our house. One morning, we decided to make a run for the hospital, so that we could put ourselves under the protection of the Red Cross. Our neighbors were running in front of us, pushing their belongings on a pushcart, when they stepped on a land mine and the whole family was killed. We kept running, but when we got to the main street, there was a checkpoint and we weren’t allowed to cross. So we hid beneath a house, and soon we were discovered by Japanese soldiers. They lined us all up against the wall to be executed. We begged and begged and begged for our lives. They finally allowed my mother and the children to step aside, but they told my father to stay. My mother dropped to her knees and asked the Japanese commander to imagine it was his family. And he finally let all of us go.”

humansofnewyork:

“We fled to the Philippines, which was under American occupation at the time. But it wasn’t long before the Japanese took over the islands. We were living in Manila, and when the Japanese occupied the city, they began to teach us to read and write Japanese. When the Americans came to retake the city, they invaded from the north, and the Japanese blew up the bridges and barricaded themselves in the southern part of the city where we lived. Shells were falling all around us, because the Japanese had stationed a gun encampment across from our house. One morning, we decided to make a run for the hospital, so that we could put ourselves under the protection of the Red Cross. Our neighbors were running in front of us, pushing their belongings on a pushcart, when they stepped on a land mine and the whole family was killed. We kept running, but when we got to the main street, there was a checkpoint and we weren’t allowed to cross. So we hid beneath a house, and soon we were discovered by Japanese soldiers. They lined us all up against the wall to be executed. We begged and begged and begged for our lives. They finally allowed my mother and the children to step aside, but they told my father to stay. My mother dropped to her knees and asked the Japanese commander to imagine it was his family. And he finally let all of us go.”